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Review: L.A. Cetto Chenin Blanc 2014

If you’ve read my blog more than a couple of times, (thank you), you know that I like variety. More than just variety, I seek out the obscure. Be it a small production bottle, a little-known varietal, or a grape not normally associated with a particular region, if I can get my hands on it, I will buy it and try it.  

Stay with me here, I promise its relevant. A Facebook friend recently posted the following question: “What is your favorite wine?” I assume the idea was to see what kinds of varied responses he would get. Perhaps out of simple curiosity, or maybe as a parlor game. Or maybe he was genuinely looking for ideas or recommendations of what to try. Regardless, I could not provide a simple answer. In my response, I stated that there were simply too many options and variables for me to select a single “favorite” wine. White or red? With what meal would I be serving the wine? The point is, I don’t want to limit myself to a favorite. I crave variety.  

Chenin Blanc seems to be making a comeback in recent months, and I am quite happy with this. Don’t get me wrong; a few years ago, I may have turned my nose up at Chenin Blanc. As a child, I remember my parents drinking Chenin Blanc wine from a gallon jug, so as I got into wine as an adult, I associated Chenin Blanc with cheap, jug wine. It wasn’t until a couple of years ago, when I received a sample of a Clarksburg Chenin Blanc from NakedWines.com that I came to appreciate the delicate, floral, tropical-fruity goodness that is this grape. Since then, I’ve enjoyed a number of bottles from California, South Africa, and its native home, France.  

So there I was, cruising the Italian Wines aisle of my local Total Wine & More store, looking for an interesting white wine to enjoy during the last few hot days of summer. Something caught my eye. L.A. Cetto Chenin Blanc 2014. A Chenin Blanc from Italy? Say no more – into the basket it went. I didn’t even take the time to examine the label.  

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As I unpacked the wine at home, preparing to log it into my Vivino app before setting it aside in the chiller until the right moment, I noticed something odd. On the label were these words: Valle De Guadalupe, Baja California. Eureka! I had accidentally stumbles across my first Mexican wine! Clearly someone at Total Wine thought L.A. Cetto sounded Italian, so it ended up in the wrong bin. 

The website listed on their label, lacetto.mx, is in Spanish. Fortunately, I took Spanish in high school, Google Chrome has a translation feature, so I could read the information. From the L.A. Cetto website:

“LA Cetto Winery is undoubtedly the Mexican company that is the leader in the production of quality wine. With 88 years of experience acquired by 3 generations, its wines are now found in Mexico and in 27 countries in the world.” 

L.A. Cetto was founded by Don Angelo Cetto. Born Angelo Cetto Carli in Selva di Levico, Trento, Italy in 1900, Don Angelo arrived in Mexico in 1924. It was he who, in 1928, had the vision and planted wine grapes in Baja California. In 1951, Don Angelo’s son, Don Luis Agustin Cetto, took over and grew the company, hiring an Italian oenologist, Camilo Magoni. In 1983, the L.A. Cetto label was introduced to the wine market, and the third generation of the family, Luis Alberto Cetto, joined the team.  

In my quest for variety and the obscure, I was excited to try this new find. So on a recent, warm Sunday afternoon, I liberated the cork and poured a couple of glasses. Here’s what I thought of it:  

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Light straw color in the glass. On the nose, aromas of apricot and citrus. There are flavors soft citrus, yellow apple, pear, and hints of quince and apricot. The wine has lively acidity and a soft, round mouthfeel. The finish lingers with delightful of tropical fruit notes. A very smooth and easy drinking wine, and a great introduction to the wines of Mexico. At just $8.99, an excellent value, too!  

I encourage you to seek out a bottle of this fun and delicious wine, and give it a try. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do. Let me know your thoughts in the comments!  

Cheers!  

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Dinner on a Bridge (#MWWC35)

The weather was perfect; sunny with temperatures in the low-80’s as the event started. We were fortunate to be there. This is one of the most anticipated events in Sacramento. It is so popular in fact, that tickets are sold by lottery. I’ve wanted to go in the past, but have not been able to attend. However, this year, for the Fifth Annual Farm-to-Fork Tower Bridge Dinner, I won tickets in a sweepstakes hosted by the Golden 1 Credit Union, one of the sponsors of the dinner.

If you read my previous post, you know that Sacramento, California, is the Farm-to-Fork Capital of America. As part of the annual festivities, the Tower Bridge Dinner brings together farmers, farm workers, renown chefs, local celebrities, politicians, and foodies of all stripes, for an epic and magical evening. Dinner on a bridge! The Tower Bridge is an iconic landmark in Sacramento, spanning the Sacramento river from Downtown to the city of West Sacramento. It is an active roadway and drawbridge, yet one evening each year, the bridge is closed to traffic and white-linen covered tables are stretched from end to end. The goal of the event is to be “a truly spectacular culinary event…” A meal that “showcases the incredible bounty being grown and raised by some of our region’s most prolific farmers and ranchers who are at the heart of the farm-to-fork movement.” Some of the region’s best chefs work their magic on the ingredients, and the resulting experience is spectacular!

Upon arrival, guests are welcome to grab a glass of local wine or beer, and wander the bridge while nibbling on a variety of amazing appetizers. We sampled oysters, caviar, carpaccio, and other delicacies. The wine was free-flowing, and throughout the evening we enjoyed glasses of Muddy Boot Clarksburg Chenin Blanc, Conduit Amador County Viognier, Turkovich Yolo County Tempranillo, Divergent Vine Amador County Barbera, and Rancho Victoria Amador County Petite Sirah. Each wine complemented the food and enhanced the magic.

The four-course meal started with Chile en Nogada, a roasted poblano chile with picadillo, and walnut crema, prepared by Chef Ernesto Delgado from the Mayajuel restaurant. The farms that provided the ingredients were were Rancho Llano Seco and Stephens Ranch. The poblano was a little hot for a few folks at our table, but I thoroughly enjoyed it and the Chenin Blanc paired nicely to cut the heat.

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Next up was Smoked Mount Lassen Steelhead Trout, with cucumber, crème fraiche, flowering herbs, and cured roe. This was prepared by Chef Kurt Spataro from the Paragary Restaurant Group. The trout was sourced by Passmore Ranch, from Mt. Lassen Trout Farm, and the vegetables came from Soil Born Farms. The trout was melt-in-your-mouth tender, and absolutely delicious!

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The third course was a Smoked Grassfed Ribeye, with curried turnip puree, pickled onions and sweet peppers, Easter Egg radish, cherry tomato, and chimi-churri sauce. Prepared by Taylor’s Kitchen Chef Casey Shideler, it was cooked to medium-rare perfection and fork-tender. The beef came from Richard’s Grassfed Beef, and the produce from Riverdog Farm and Aldon Leafy Greens. I went with the Petite Sirah with this and it was amazing!

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The fourth and final course was a two-parter. First was grilled lamb loin with bronze fennel yogurt, compressed cucmuber and tomato salad, and nasturtium. The farms providing this delectable delight were Azolla Farms, Emigh Lamb Co., and Laughing Duck Farms. The dish was prepared by Chef Chris Barnum-Dann from Localis restaurant. I lack the vocabulary to adequately describe this sensational dish. Exquisite. That’s the best I can do.

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Finally, we ended the meal with “Pork and Beans.” No, not your campfire can of Van Camp’s. This was sliced prochetta with a late harvest corn and bean medley, and stone fruit gastrique. This round was prepared by Chefs Michael Tuohy and Santana Diaz from Legends Hospitality at the Golden 1 Center, Sacramento’s new sports arena. The ingredients came from Rancho Llano Seco, Dwelley farms, and Twin Peaks Orchards. Another amazing dish that was immensely satisfying on all levels.

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Once dinner was over, guests were invited to stroll the promenade and indulge in small desserts and dessert wines. As if we needed more to eat and drink! Still, we’re not quitters, so we made our way over to enjoy the view of the river, and just a few more bites and sips. The Late Harvest Viognier from Legendre Cellars in Fiddletown was a real treat and a perfect way to end the evening. Completely satisfied, and full of great new memories, we summoned our Uber for the ride home.

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I cannot thank Golden 1 Credit Union enough for sponsoring the sweepstakes that allowed us to attend the Tower Bridge Dinner. It was a night we will never forget. The food, the wine, and the wonderful people of Sacramento created a dining experience that has eclipsed all others I’ve enjoyed.

Monthly Wine Writing Challenge

In addition to describing this heavenly event, this post is also my submission into Monthly Wine Writing Challenge (#MWWC35). Last month’s winner, Erik of Red, White & Cru, selected to topic “Eclipse” for this month’s theme. The Tower Bridge Dinner certainly accomplished an eclipse of astronomical proportion in my culinary experience.

Cheers!

 

Farm-to-Fork Legends of Wine

Among other things, Sacramento, California is known as America’s Farm-to-Fork Capital. Each year, the Sacramento Convention & Visitors Bureau hosts several Farm-to-Fork events, celebrating the region’s agricultural heritage and commitment to farm-fresh, local dining. This includes not only food, but wine as well. This past Thursday, we were fortunate to attend the annual Farm-to-Fork Legends of Wine event.

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Held on the front steps of the California State Capitol building, the Legends of Wine event features wine tastings of several local wineries from the region. Attendees had the opportunity to sample the some of the best wines produced in the Lodi, Sierra Foothills, and surrounding areas, and enjoy small bites like lamb sliders, gourmet cheeses, fresh-baked bread, and gelato. Many winery owners and winemakers were on hand to pour and answer questions about their wines.

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Darrell Corti, left, and David Berkley, right. Dude taking a picture, in background.

Sacramento’s wine legends Darrell Corti and David Berkley help to prepare the event by selecting the best wines and wineries. One of Mr. Corti’s claims to fame is the long-running Corti Brothers market. Originally opened in downtown Sacramento in 1947, and relocated to its current East Sacramento location in 1970, the store features an authentic Italian deli and one of the best independent wine shops in the region. So beloved is Mr. Corti and the Corti Brothers store that, in 2008 when on the verge of losing the lease, Sacramento’s top celebrity chefs turned out in support and helped keep the market open.

David Berkley started his journey in wine as a part-time wine merchant at Corti Brothers. He went on to open his own wine and specialty-foods store in Sacramento, which sadly closed after 25 years in business. Yet, his story doesn’t end there. Mr. Berkley has served as a wine consultant for the White House, serving President Reagan, both Presidents Bush, and President Clinton.

After several weeks of scorching heat, the weather cooperated and graced us with a perfect, late summer evening. Clear skies, and temperatures in the low-80’s at the start of the event, created a delightful atmosphere for tasting, noshing, and mingling. I lost count, but there were well over two-dozen wineries present. We tasted several old favorites from wineries we know, and found a number of new favorites. Our weekends will be full over the next few months, visiting all the new wineries and winemaker friends we met at the event.

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Unintended cool photo effects when the flash accidentally went off.

If you happen to be in the Sacramento area in a future September, check out the Legends of Wine event. Perhaps we’ll see you there!

Cheers!

Canned Wine – A Review of Underwood Pinot Gris

Wine in a can? Seriously?  

Actually, there are many advantages. Portability is the most obvious. But also consider weight (aluminum weights less than glass, which reduces carbon footprint when shipping), durability (aluminum doesn’t break like glass could), and accessibility (No glass containers allowed at the pool? No problem.) Taking these factors into consideration, it’s definitely worth giving this latest wine trend a try.  

In addition to it’s traditional bottled wines, Union Wine Co., located near Portland, Oregon, produces and markets wine in a can under the Underwood label. You’ve probably seen it in Trader Joe’s, Target, Total Wine & More, or pretty much any other local supermarket. The can is 375 ml, half of a traditional 750 ml wine bottle, and about the same as a standard 12 ounce (355 ml) beer or soda cans. No corkscrew required, as the cans are equipped with the standard pull tab familiar to, well, everyone. Five different wines are produced: Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Rosé, Sparking, and Sparking Rosé. As best as I can determine, all are Non-Vintage.  

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Photo Credit: unionwinecompany.com

With reasoning similar to the recent upsurge in boxed wine, Union Wine Co.’s philosophy is that “it’s more important what goes into the glass than what type of glass it is“. That is, the quality of the wine in the vessel is more important than the vessel in which it comes. Concerned about metallic tasting wine? Don’t be. The cans have a liner that prevents the wine from contacting the aluminum.  

And let’s get real about this. If you were to swig your wine straight from the bottle, you’d get some serious side-eye from your neighbors. From a can? No problem. Half the folks around you probably wouldn’t even notice its wine, and not beer or soda. Slip on a Koozie, and you’re home free!  

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Hmm. I wonder what’s in that can.

But the all important question is…how’s the wine? On the day I shopped, only Pinot Noir and Pinot Gris were available at my local Trader Joe’s, for $4.99 per can. That makes them the equivalent of a $10 bottle. I picked up a can of Pinot Gris, and after adequate chilling, I gave it a try. Here’s what I thought:   

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Is it pretentious to pour canned wine into a glass?

Pale straw color. Aromas of green apple, pear, and lemon-lime. On the palate, bright acidity gives it a tangy profile with flavors of green apple, lemon, pineapple, and the slightest hint of stone fruit. Fairly short finish. Less fruity and higher acidity than many PG’s. All in all, pretty good, but not my regular go-to. However, for a picnic, camp out, or other outdoor event where one wants a light weight and portable container, and an easy drinking refresher, this is a nice choice. 

So, while I wouldn’t necessarily buy this to pair with a nice meal or take it to a restaurant (would they charge a “tabage fee?”), it is a solid, affordable wine, and an excellent choice for a day at the lake or pool, weekend camping trip, or “alcohol-permitted” concert in the park. Portable, recyclable, and lighter-weight for easy transport, give Underwood wine-in-a-can a try.  

Have you tried Underwood or any other canned wine? Let me know what you thought of it in the comments.  

Cheers!  

A Visit to LangeTwins

What do you think of when you hear about a family owned winery? If you are like me, you envision a small, mom-and-pop operation, with a quaint, small tasting room, producing perhaps a few hundred cases of wine per year. What you probably don’t expect is a massive winery operation on the scale of LangeTwins. What? Never heard of LangeTwins? That may be because producing their own private label wine is just a portion of what they do here.

I recently visited LangeTwins Winery, located in Lodi, California, with friends Robyn, Anthony, and Kim. Despite living only about an hour from Lodi for 14 years, and being something of a wine guy (as suggested by this blog), this was my first tasting trip to Lodi. Yes, I am ashamed of myself and have no valid excuses. Anyway, as I rounded the bend and the facility came into view, I thought perhaps I had missed my turn and was arriving at a Gallo or Mondovi facility. Yet the monument sign that greeted us confirmed we were at the right place.
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We had arranged a winery tour with winemaker David Akiyoshi, who Anthony and I know though our mutual affiliation with NakedWines.com. In addition to his responsibilities and LangeTwins, David also produces wines under his own label that are sold by NakedWines.com. David has worked in the wine industry for more than 30 years. His tenure includes 25 years at Woodbridge. An interesting fact that David shared is that as children, during World War II, his parents were both sent to internment camps. As an adult, David’s father rose to success in the wine industry, including oenology research at U.C. Davis. David later followed his father in a wine career. David is a personable and engaging guide. He is clearly passionate about what he does, and gets great enjoyment in sharing his passion with guests. As a result, what was supposed to be a one-hour tour, stretched into nearly three hours!

The Lange family has been growing grapes in the Lodi area for five generations. In 2006, Brad and Randy Lange – the “Twins” of LangeTwins – started the winery operation. They brought David Akiyoshi in as winemaker and together, they built a state-of-the-art winemaking facility. The Langes gave David virtually free-reign in designing and constructing the operation. As David explained, when he asked for equipment or supplies, the Langes only wanted assurance that they were the best available for the production; they never asked about cost. The result is an impressive, sustainable, and continually expanding winery with the latest in technology and production equipment. The crush pad is topped with bifacial photovoltaic solar panels, capturing both direct sunlight and reflected light from below, while providing shade for workers below. They generate enough electricity to fully power their operation, and provide surplus energy back to the grid.

In addition to their own wines, LangeTwins offers a variety of services to other producers in the region. These include vineyard management, grape sales, winemaking, and bottling. They recently installed the most up-to-date bottling line, capable of churning out 120 bottles per minute, and provide bottling and labeling services to several wineries that you would readily recognize. (For proprietary reasons, those names could not be revealed, and photography in the bottling area is prohibited.)

David showed us around the grape hoppers (originally designed for pickling cucumbers but better suited for grapes); conveyers; four massive crushers; fermentation tanks ranging from small-lot to some of the largest, custom built tanks I’ve ever seen; and the barrel room, where we had some fun with barrel thieving.  

After the tour, David delivered us to the capable hands of the LangeTwins tasting room staff, where we enjoyed samples of the finished product. LangeTwins makes a large variety of wines, from light and lively whites, to a crisp, zesty Sangiovese Rosé, to big, bold red blends and varietal wines. Everything we tasted was exceptional. So much so that we decided to join the wine club, thus ensuring return visits, at least quarterly, for the foreseeable future.

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No trip to Lodi is complete without a stop at LangeTwins Winery. If you are in the area, I encourage you to stop in for a tasting. If time allows, click here to schedule a private tasting and winery tour. If you happen to run into David Akiyoshi while you’re there, tell him I said “hi.”

PaZa Estate Winery – A Hidden Gem

Always on the prowl for hidden gems in the wine world, a few days ago we headed out to explore our own backyard on the nearby Placer County Wine Trail. Located east of Sacramento, along the Interstate 80 corridor on the way to Lake Tahoe, the Placer County Wine Trail features 19 wineries, and counting.

Placer County is part of the larger Sierra Foothills AVA. Wine grapes were first planted in here in 1848. If that year seems familiar, it could be because it is the same year gold was discovered in nearby Coloma, sparking the historic California Gold Rush. The miners who traveled to seek their fortunes also came with a mighty thirst. Enterprising European immigrants recognized that planting vineyards and making wine could be a lucrative way to quench the miners’ thirst. In the 1860’s, there were more vineyards and wineries in Placer County than in Napa and Sonoma counties combined! With warm days and cool nights, many Mediterranean varietals thrive in this area.

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With limited time available that day, we were only able to visit a couple of wineries. Consulting the Wine Trail map in the pamphlet we picked up, we set our coordinates for PaZa Estate Winery. Winding our way through the hilly, two-lane roads between Lincoln and Auburn, California, we were glad to have GPS on our phones! Over hill and dale, we carefully made our way. As instructed by Siri, we made a hard right in the middle of a 90-degree left turn, and continued on a paved, single lane road. The pavement soon gave way to gravel, and we started to think that Siri had gotten us lost. Cresting a hill, we saw the sign informing us we were approaching our destination. Rounding another curve, a paved parking lot welcomed us next to a residential home. Walking a short distance from the parking lot on a wide gravel path, we soon entered the shaded tasting…shed. Yes, you read that right…PaZa Estate Winery has an open-concept tasting shed, rather than a room. And for good reason! Why would they want to obscure the amazing vineyard and valley views with walls?

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Our host that day was Operations Manager, Cindy. She gave us some of the history of the PaZa story. The name, PaZa, is an amalgamation of the first letters of the owners’ names: Pamela and Zane Dobson. Sharing a love for wines, and having enjoyed fulfilling careers and hobbies, they decided to embark on a winemaking journey. They bought the property where the winery is now located in 2005. The first vines were planted in 2007. In 2009, they produced their first vintage, using grapes sourced from other vineyards. Finally, in 2011, the first vintage of estate wines was produced. Estate varietals include Barbera, Primitivo, Petite Sirah, Albariño, and Zinfandel. No fining materials are used, making PaZa wines suitable for vegetarians and vegans.

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The day of our visit was warm, but in the shade of the shed and with a cooling breeze through the trees and vines, we enjoyed our tastings of one white and three reds. The 2016 Chardarino, a blend of 60% Albariño and 40% Chardonnay, we delightfully refreshing, with a full mouthfeel and crisp tropical and citrus flavors. The reds included a 2102 Primitivo, a 2013 Barbera, and their LTD – Living the Dream red blend.  Aged three years in French oak, the Primitivo burst with dark berry and cherry flavors, and plenty of vanilla and spice. The Barbera was also aged in French oak for three years, and was soft and smooth, with dark cherry and blackberry flavors. The LTD – Living the Dream is a 50/50 blend of Zinfandel and Petite Sirah, and was rich and delicious with ripe blackberry, cherry, and black pepper notes. Big and bold, with firm tannins, the LTD would make an excellent wine to pair with a steak or any other grilled meats.

img_0028img_0027If you are in the area, and would like to experience some true hidden gems while taking in some breathtaking views from the tasting shed, come visit PaZa Estate Winery. Set your GPS to 3357 Ayers Holmes Rd., Auburn, CA 95602, and enjoy the ride.

 

Want Great Wines? Head South.

For excellent wines at great values, head south. For interesting takes on your favorite varietals, head south. To expand your understanding of terroir and its influence on wine, head south. Wines from South America, specifically Chile and Argentina, define all these statements. I recently had the opportunity to experience three outstanding South American wines: Montes Limited Selection Pinot Noir 2014, Montes Twins Red Blend 2014, and KAIKEN Terroir Series Torrontés 2016.

The Three

For many years, right or wrong, Chile had the reputation of creating bulk wines of inferior quality. In 1988, Aurelio Montes, Sr. and Douglas Murray set out to challenge that notion, when they founded Viña Montes. These two pioneers believed that the unique conditions and terroir in Chile could produce world-class wines. Their first project was a Bordeaux-style red blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Merlot. In 1998, the first vintage of Montes Alpha M was released. Subsequent lines, including Folly and Purple Angel, followed, with great success and popularity. Over the past 29 years, additional labels were introduced, at various price points, including Montes Limited Selection, the Classic Series, Cherub Rose, and the Montes Twins.

Montes Pantone

Those familiar with the Montes name will recognize the iconic angel on the label. That angel was inspired by Douglas Murray, who developed an abiding faith in angels after surviving two different near-fatal auto accidents. Montes adopted the angel icon to symbolize their commitment to be a positive force and influence. In keeping with that mission, Montes is a leader in environmental sustainability. Since 2009, Montes has implemented strategies to reduce fossil fuel consumption by 30%, and use of fertilizers by 50%. Sheep now help with weed control, and the winery has begun covering water reservoirs with geomembranes that reduce water leakage from two gallons per second to zero!

The Montes family of wines has certainly succeeded in breaking the mold and improving the quality and reputation of Chilean wines. So it follows that Aurelio Montes, Sr., would seek to expand his influence beyond the Chilean borders. In 2001, Montes, Sr., founded KAIKEN Winery on the other side of the Andes mountains, in Mendoza, Argentina. The Kaiken is a near-extinct bird, native to the region, known for soaring over the high, mountain peaks. Now run by son, Aurelio Montes, Jr., KAIKEN’s logo features a representation of “birds in flight” travelling over the Andes mountains. In keeping with the environmental commitment at Montes, in 2011 KAIKEN started managing its vineyards with biodynamic principles. They are pursuing a goal of being 100% biodynamic by the end of this year (2017.)

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Seeking to take Argentinian wines beyond just Malbec, the KAIKEN wine portfolio includes four labels: Mai, Ultra, Terroir Series, and Reserve. Malbec is featured in the Mai line, and is represented in others, but the Ultra, Terroir Series, and Reserve lines include reds composed of Cabernet Sauvignon, Petit Verdot, and Bonarda, along with Malbec. White wines are produced from Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, and the more Argentine-associated Torrontés.

So how do they taste? Well, here’s what I thought of them:

Montes Limited Selection Pinot Noir 2014 

100% Pinot Noir from the Acongagua Coast, aged 6-7 months in French Oak and Stainless Steel barrels.  

This is a complex, well-balanced Pinot Noir. Ruby red color with a slightly brick rim. On the nose there are aromas of soft earth and ripe raspberry. The complexity is evident from the initial sniff. On the palate, soft, supple tannins and light acidity dance on the tongue with earthy influences mingling with raspberry, cherry, plum, and red currant flavors. Medium body, with a lingering finish of red fruit and a hint of cola at the end.

I find some Pinot Noir to be too earthy, with the soil and mushroom flavors overpowering the fruit. The Montes Pinot Noir has just the right amount of earthiness, that enhances the fruit and makes this a very enjoyable wine. Paired with grilled salmon, it was truly delightful. It would also go nicely with other foods, including pork or mushroom risotto.

Average Price: $13 (Wine Searcher)

Montes Twins Red Blend 2014 

35% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Syrah, 25% Carmenère, 10% Tempranillo, from the Colchagua Valley. 50% of the wine was aged for 10 months in first, second, and third-use French Oak barrels. 

Very impressive red blend. Deep purple color in the glass. On the nose, aromas of Black Cherry, Raspberry, Blackberry, and a hint of soft vanilla. After several swirls and minutes to open up, the palate offers juicy flavors of Blackberry, Black Currant, Black Cherry, and Dark Chocolate, with soft oak and vanilla influences. Rich and full-bodied, with a complex character and soft, velvety tannins and fresh acidity, the wine finishes with a flourish of dark berry, chocolate, and hints of licorice and spice. This is an intriguing, sexy wine that pairs well with anything from the grill: beef, lamb, pork…we had it with grilled Sweet Italian Sausages and the pairing was spectacular!

Average Price: $12 (Wine Searcher)

KAIKEN Terroir Series Torrontés 2016 

100% Torrontés from Salta, Argentina. Fermented and aged 6 months on the lees.  

Pale golden color in the glass. There are aromas of lemon-lime and citrus, with a hint of elderflower. On the palate, there are flavors of lemon and lime, with grapefruit, quince, and mandarin. There is bright, lively acidity, but the wine has a soft, smooth mouthfeel – evidence of aging on the lees. On the finish, the citrus notes continue, and some pear joins the party.

This is a delightfully refreshing wine, especially on the blistering hot day we tasted it. It paired magically with grilled Mahi-Mahi tacos, taking our simple, mid-week meal to a whole new level.

Average Price: $13 (Wine Searcher)

 

Delicious, food-friendly, and budget-friendly, I highly recommend that you seek out and try these wines. They are widely distributed and available, so you won’t even have to go to South America to find them!

Cheers!

Disclaimer: These wines were submitted to me as samples for review. I received no other compensation or incentive. Technical information was provided with the samples. All opinions and descriptions are my own.