Monthly Archives: September 2021

Our Wine of the Week: McIntyre Pinot Noir 2018

As the world slowly reopens, our commitment to support local is stronger than ever. Many of our local restaurants remained open for take-out and delivery, and helped sustain us throughout lockdown. One of our favorite locally-owned, independent restaurants is RANGE Kitchen & Tap. We wrote about RANGE back in 2018, not long after they opened, and the quality, service, and hospitality has only gotten better since then. 

We recently paid RANGE a visit for dinner, and happened upon this week’s Wine of the Week. Along with their regular menu, RANGE always has at least two specials: a Fresh Catch and a Game of the Week. On this particular day, the Fresh Catch was Pan Seared Scallops served over a bed of Mushroom Risotto, and the Game was Duck Breast with an Orange Glaze served with Braised Red Cabbage, Bacon Lardon, and Confit Bintje Potatoes. (Kent had to look it up afterward because he stopped listening after “Duck Breast!”) Robyn has had the Scallops before, and knowing how delicious they are, didn’t hesitate to order them again. 

With our decisions made on our entrees, the next challenge was wine pairing. Usually, finding a single bottle that will pair with both light seafood and a rich duck dish can be a real conundrum. However, in this case, the Mushroom Risotto served with the Scallops made the decision a bit easier. Perusing the wine list, Kent’s eyes fixed on the McIntyre Pinot Noir Santa Lucia Highlands 2018. Our server concurred, and commented that of all the Pinot Noirs on the menu, this was her favorite with duck. Say no more.   

Chef Kevin never disappoints, and as expected, the food was exquisite (you’ll have to imagine the Scallops and Risotto since we somehow managed to forget to take a picture) and the wine pairing was perfect with both entrees. 

Deep garnet color. On the nose, smoky raspberry, bold red fruit and cherry, and plum notes. These carry to the palate, with flavors of raspberry, bing cherry, tobacco, leather, smoked meat, and baking spice. Integrated tannins, with smooth, medium acidity, medium body, and a long finish of ripe red fruit and black pepper.

McIntyre’s 60 acre Estate Vineyard was planted in 1973, making it one of the oldest Pinot Noir and Chardonnay vineyards in Santa Lucia Highlands. It is also one of the first vineyards in the region to be Sustainability In Practice (SIP) certified. As a smaller production winery, McIntyre wines are available at select restaurants and wine shops. If you come across them, try them! 

What was your wine of the week?

Cheers!

  • Text and photos by Kent Reynolds and Robyn Raphael-Reynolds

Our Wine of the Week: Marchesi Incisa della Rocchetta Valmorena Barbera d’Asti 2018

Every once in a while, you score a wine that absolutely exceeds expectations. Our Wine of the Week this week is one of those wines. A few weeks back, Wine.com was having one of their red wine sales. Always on the prowl for bargains, we checked it out and, among a few others we purchased, we snagged a couple bottles of Marchesi Incisa della Rocchetta Valmorena Barbera d’Asti 2018

We are big fans of Barbera, but typically prefer bottles from Amador County in the Sierra Foothills, where Barbera grows exceptionally well. Barbera is one of the few varieties that we generally favor richer, fruit-forward New World versions over Old World. Maybe we just hadn’t found the right ones, but many of the Italian Barberas we’ve had have been rather thin and lacking, with acidity approaching excessive. Well, the Marchesi Incisa della Rocchetta Valmorena Barbera d’Asti 2018 was about to blow that stereotype right out of the water!

Marchesi Incisa della Rocchetta has more than 1,000 years of history in the Piedmont region of Italy. The Incisa family ancestors settled there in the 11th century. In the 13th century, local monks leased land from the Incisa family to cultivate grapes, and by the 19th century, the Marchese Leopoldo Incisa della Rocchetta had become known in the region for his viticulture and winemaking. He was an early pioneer in experimenting with Pinot Noir plantings in Piedmont. Members of the family have expanded to Tuscany, where Sangiovese is king, but the Piedmont estate is still owned and operated by members of the Incisa della Rocchetta family. In the 1990’s the Marchesa Barbara Incisa della Rocchetta inherited and purchased the estate and continues operations to this day, producing wines from local native grape varieties like Barbera, Grignolino, Moscato d’Asti and Arneis, while continuing production of international varieties such as Pinot Noir and Merlot.

With such prestigious and long-standing wine making history, how can you go wrong? You can’t. The Valmorena Barbera d’Asti 2018 is a stunning, breath-taking wine. It really changed our minds about Old World Barbera. We opened our first bottle with grilled pork loin and the experience was euphoric. Recently, we brought our second bottle to a friend’s house for a homemade pizza night. With seven hungry (and thirsty) adults in the house, suffice it to say we opened more than one bottle of good wine that night. But the one that stood out, head and shoulders above all others, by unanimous decision of all present, was our Wine of the Week, Marchesi Incisa della Rocchetta Valmorena Barbera d’Asti 2018. It’s just that good. 

Garnet color. Aromas of blackberry bramble, plum, and spice. On the palate, black cherry, blackberry, plum, vanilla, white pepper, and earthy notes. Bone dry with medium tannins and bright acidity, perfect for food pairing and great with grilled pork loin or pizza. Or both, why not?

The Marchesi Incisa della Rocchetta Valmorena Barbera d’Asti 2018 is available from Wine.com. As of this writing, it is on sale (still or again, doesn’t matter!) for just $16.99. Many other wines from Marchesi Incisa della Rocchetta are also available and worth trying! 

What was your wine of the week? 

Cheers!

  • Text and photos by Kent Reynolds and Robyn Raphael-Reynolds