Tag Archives: Environment

The End of Waste Foundation: Working to Increase Glass Recycling for our Planet

There is little doubt that climate change is real, and is happening. Whether it is human-caused, human-exacerbated, or simply the natural ebb and flow of Planet Earth, or some combination of all of these, I do not know. That debate is best left to the scientists who are studying the phenomenon, and the politicians who are responsible for crafting (hopefully) thoughtful legislation to deal with it.

Nevertheless, I feel it is important to do my part; to be a good steward of the only planet we have to call home. Part of this is by participating in as many recycling programs as possible. Back when recycling first entered the social consciousness – for me it was in the late 1980’s – recycling was a royal pain in the a   more difficult and complicated endeavor, which required consumer participation to manually sort one’s own trash. In my community, we had a black, regular can for general refuse, a blue can for paper, cardboard, cans, and other recyclable metals, a green can for lawn clippings, tree trimmings, and other organic waste, and a small, red bin for glass. On trash day, the streets would be lined by this rainbow of colorful receptacles. Even though I wasn’t a wine drinker in those days, I did use glass jars and other recyclable glass, and often wondered why glass only warranted a small bin, compared to the big boys like cardboard and cans.

In recent years, it has become easier and more convenient to recycle, depending on where one lives. I now live in Roseville, a community in Northern California that has the first “sorting” program I had heard of. Instead of relying on the consumer to sort their waste into three or four separate bins, like many communities, our waste management service allows us to deposit all solid waste (except green waste) into one bin. This is then taken to a facility where the waste is sorted and recyclables separated out for processing. What a great way to passively feel like I’m contributing to saving Planet Earth.

But am I? What really happens to those recyclables once they are dumped into that big truck every week? Do they really separate out the recyclables? Is recycling even profitable, and sustainable, especially for glass? 

While not in the forefront of my mind always, but certainly when rolling the solid waste bin to the curb every week, those questions persisted. So it was a pleasant surprise when, a few weeks ago, I received an email from Nikolas Zilenski, of the End of Waste Foundation, inquiring if I’d be interested in featuring the Foundation’s work and progress in a blog article. 

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Image credit: End of Waste Foundation website.

As I began researching for this post, I was disheartened. My concerns are real. The End of Waste Foundation (EOWF) has determined that nearly six million tons of glass goes unrecycled in the United States each year. But there is hope.

EOWF has created a sustainable packaging certification program, designed to increase glass recycling in the U.S., including tracking and monitoring recycling rates in participating communities. Known as the Recycling Traceability System™, the program receives recycling data from Material Recycling Facilities (MFRs) and issues a certificate of validation to verify the data. Participating businesses receive a Sustainable Packaging Certificate or Recycling Certificate to offset their carbon footprint.

In my correspondence with Nikolas, I shared my concerns and frustration: 

“Your website indicates this step, the recycling, is actually not happening as much as the average consumer (me) thinks it is. Can you shed some insight into this, and why it is happening? I really think most of us believe we are doing the right thing by either sorting, or living in a community that does it for us. Are we being duped?

Nikolas shared that statistical data is often hard to come by. However, he is diligent in his research, and provided the following statement: 

“For around 30 years, China has been California’s go to solution for its recycling woes. We essentially built an economic system based on sending recyclables to China. But in 2018, China enacted the National Sword Policy, which placed strict standards on contamination levels of material sent to the country for recycling. Thus, the whole system is no longer economically viable for material recovery facilities.

This has opened up huge weak spots in the waste and recycling industry. With glass in particular, much of the loss occurs from sorting, processing and hauling.

In California, and wine in specific, there is an additional barrier to making sure that it’s being recycled as it’s one of the products that’s exempt from bottle deposit laws. Even with single stream recycling, contamination poses a hurdle for bottles being processed for re-use.

The goal here at End of Waste Foundation is to increase glass recycling rates and provide proof that recycling is actually happening with our partnerships. Transparency into the waste and recycling industry is one of the cornerstones that we’re built upon. Through our own independent research, we’ve found that around 40% of product manufacturers don’t trust the waste and recycling industry, and we want to change that.

We believe creating circular economies within the glass industry is the best way to handle two problematic fronts: environmental and economic. We believe our system benefits product manufacturers, local waste and recycling facilities, and most importantly, the environment and the local communities that live in them.”

EOWF Circular Economy

Image credit: End of Waste Foundation website.

Still in relative infancy, EOWF’s program already has proven results. In Colorado, they partnered with Rocky Mountain Bottling Company and Momentum Recycling in June, 2019. Since then, more than 2,600 tons of glass has been diverted from landfills

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Photo credit: End of Waste Foundation website.

In July, 2019, Sonoma County winery Truett Hurst joined the cause. As a biodynamic winery, CEO Paul Dolan has been concerned about studies that have shown that glass can account for up to 60% of a winery’s carbon footprint. He was interested in learning ways his winery, and the wine industry in general, can become more sustainable. Dolan hopes that by leading the way, more winemakers and winery owners will get on board. 

Truett Hurst

Photo credit: End of Waste Foundation website.

For more information, please follow the links to the stories above. 

You may be thinking, sure, EOWF is partnering with businesses to increase recycling and reduce their carbon footprint, but what can I do as an individual? Glad you asked. Individuals, families, and small business owners can get involved through financial contributions and raising awareness in their own communities.

Personally, I am encouraged by the efforts of EOWF and their partners. In fact, I am more inclined to purchase products from producers such as Rocky Mountain Bottling Company and Truett Hurst. By the way, Truett Hurst makes amazing wine, so I encourage you to support the cause and buy some of their wine today! 

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Saving our planet, one bottle at a time.

Individually, we can only do so much. But by joining together and supporting this cause, we can effect positive change for future generations. 

And that’s something I can drink to!

Cheers! 

Warm Reds for Cold Nights, Part 2

While some parts of the country are starting to see signs of spring, other regions are still being pummeled by harsh winter storms. Yes, some of the trees and bushes in our neighborhood have buds and blooms, but there is another major winter storm bearing down on Northern California as we write this.

The following wine was provided as a media sample for review. All reviews, descriptions, and opinions are our own. We received no additional compensation.

For the second installment of our four-part mini-series, we journey to Portugal. Portugal and her wines are trending strongly of late, and for good reason. Portugal is the sunniest country in Europe, and features amazing wine, food, and culture, miles of coastline, and warm, welcoming people. With more than 200 indigenous grapes, there is a wide variety of outstanding wine available at attractive prices. So we were quite pleased when we received a sample of José Maria da Fonseca Periquita Reserva 2016 for tasting and review.

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José Maria da Fonseca has a family history spanning nearly two centuries. Since 1834, the family has been carrying on the passion and commitment of the founder, as the oldest producer of table wine in Portugal. Not a family to rest on their laurels, the José Maria da Fonseca family invests in research and the latest technology in winemaking. Yet with all the advances, the passion of crafting fine wine shines through in the wine.

An alluring blend of 56% Castelao, 22% Touriga Nacional, 22% Touriga Francesca, the José Maria da Fonseca Periquita Periquita 2016 is aged for 8 months in French and American oak. We opened it to pair with grilled chicken, marinated in a locally produced Basque-style marinade and gorgonzola & bacon stuffed portobella mushrooms. Yes, grilled. As in, outdoors. It’s never too cold or too stormy for grilling at the Appetite for Wine house!

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Deep ruby color. On the nose there are aromas of raspberry, cherry, cedar, and earth. On the palate, complex and integrated flavors of blackberry, black cherry, cranberry, and red currant, with oak and cedar notes. Full bodied with a luscious, round mouthfeel and brisk acidity. Long, lingering finish of red fruit and white pepper. Paired with our grilled, marinated chicken and mushrooms, it was exquisite! Vivino average price: $15.99.

We are quite happy to have these warm reds to help us through these cold nights. Chapter three will be posted soon. In the meantime, check out José Maria da Fonseca, and let us know what you think.

Cheers!

  • By Kent Reynolds and Robyn Raphael

Experience Alexander Valley, Day 1, Part 2 – deLorimier Winery

I arrived and deLorimier a little bit early for the Sensory Experience. Kent had to drop me off and get to his experience across the valley. As I waited for the event to start, I enjoyed walking in the beautiful courtyard and nearby grounds, while sipping on a glass of deLorimier’s 2017 Sauvignon Blanc, that the tasting room staff had brought out for me.

I was first greeted by Ben, the shy vineyard dog. He hesitantly approached me, and dropped a piece of wood, with the apparent expectation that I would throw the wood and engage in a game of fetch with him. Owner and winemaker, Diane Wilson, explained that once you engage with Ben, you’re on the hook.

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The two other guests arrived, and we were escorted into a beautiful, private tasting room. My eye was drawn to the tables, which were hand-made by a local craftsman, and made from old wine barrels cut in half lengthwise, filled with corks and some deLorimier wine bottles, and covered with glass. I love artistic expression! Our tables were set with a blind tasting, complete with black, non-transparent wine glasses. I’d never done a sensory experience, so I was really excited to see what I would learn, and how I would do in the blind tasting.

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We were presented with five paper strips, each with a particular essential oil scent. It was at that moment, that I was wishing Ben could be my wingman. As a dog, according to Diane, Ben has 300 million olfactory receptors, as compared to humans, who only have 6 million. Nevertheless, I put my sniffer to the test.

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First, we took a sip of each wine, to identify only whether it was a red or a white. If we wanted to throw out a guess at the varietal, we could. They were all room temperature, to make it more complicated. I got all the colors right, although I mistook their Rosé for a Chardonnay. (They didn’t say there could be a Rosé in there.) I smelled each of the scents, and one by one, matched them to the wines. I must say, I surprised myself; I was close or right on many of the aromas and varietals.

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The most exciting part of the experience was the food pairing. Chef Donna Parsons prepared the most delectable dishes to pair with each of the wines. That was our last challenge: pairing each dish with the appropriate wine. Luckily, she made it easy and presented left-to-right. But, still, I picked correctly with each wine and food pairing!

During the experience, Ben was by my side the whole time. I would kick his piece of wood a short distance, and then he would pick it up, bring it back, and drop it on my foot until I kicked it again. I think he was my lucky sensory partner! Maybe Ben was my wingman after all.

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After this amazing experience, Kent and I met up, grabbed some lunch, and then enjoyed a Cabernet Sauvignon and Chocolate pairing at Stonestreet Estate Vineyards. You can read about that in Part One of our series.

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Later that evening, we returned to deLorimier for a Blues concert. The concert was an added bonus, included with our event tickets! The band was Brad Wilson & the Rollin’ Blues Thunder Band, and they were amazing! Kent and I got the dancing going, and pretty soon the dance pad was full.

With great music and dancing, delicious food catered by Jimtown Store, and deLorimier wines, it was a great way to end an amazing day in Alexander Valley.

  • By Robyn Raphael
  • Photos by Robyn Raphael and Kent Reynolds

Organic & Biodynamic Wines and the Environment – #MWWC36

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Sometimes procrastination pays off. As I was pondering the topic for this month’s Monthly Wine Writing Challenge, Environment, and trying to determine what I would write, the Keystone Pipeline leaked some 210,000 gallons of oil. That’s about 5,000 barrels! Regardless of your opinion on the pipeline, I think we can all agree that spilling crude oil is not a positive event for the environment.  

What does this have to do with wine? Nothing, really. However, it got me thinking about how we can continue to function in the modern, industrialized world while being good stewards of the environment in which we live. Therein lies the connection to wine.  

Monthly Wine Writing Challenge

Modern agricultural operations, including vineyards, incorporate the use of things like chemical fertilizers and genetically modified organisms. Opinions vary on these topics, often passionately, and I am not here to argue any particular viewpoint. I simply want to lay a foundation and present some facts. “Just the facts, ma’am.” 

Just the Facts Ma'am

The use of fertilizers, herbicides, and pesticides have had positive effects on farming over the years, by increasing yields, and reducing damage done by insects and other pests. However, these same chemicals can leach into water tables or run off into nearby waterways, which can cause damage to desirable plants and animals, and contaminate  food and water supplies for human consumption. In recent years, many farmers have become more environmentally conscious, and are turning to natural or organic methods to control pests and increase yields.  

In viticulture, organic and biodynamic farming practices have taken root (pun intended 🙂) and are becoming more and more popular. Both methods are chemical-free, and emphasize soil health to ensure optimum growing conditions. Increasingly, consumers are seeking out organic or biodynamic wines, which encourages farmers and producers to consider these practices from both an environmental and a social responsibility perspective.  

Organic farming is regulated in the United States by the Department of Agriculture, or USDA. In vineyard management, certified organic grapes are grown without the use of any synthetic additives, such as pesticides or fertilizers. All aspects of winemaking are included in certified organic wines, including yeast strains, fining agents, and any other materials used in the production of the wine. In the wine world, organic wines may have various degrees. From certified organic wines, to those made with organic grapes but may include non-organic additives. Biodynamic wines are, by their nature, also considered organic, but are taken to a higher level. Any and all of these farming techniques reduce the amount of harmful chemicals being used and released into the environment. 
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When I first heard of Biodynamic farming, I was a little skeptical. Well, that’s a bit of an understatement…I thought it was just weird. Hippie-dippie stuff. I mean, come on, planting and harvesting based on the phases of the moon and stars? Burying cows’ horns filled with manure? Seriously? However, the more I’ve learned about biodynamic vineyard management, the more I become a believer. Or at least accepting.  

Biodynamic Horns

Biodynamic farming embraces the idea that all things are interconnected in the universe. It takes the “Butterfly Effect” to the ultimate extreme. Applying this belief involves achieving balance between the vines, earth, moon, and stars. In practice, this holistic approach to farming includes such activities as adhering to a biodynamic calendar for farming activities, and yes, burying manure-filled cows’ horns (never a bull’s horn, apparently) in the ground over the winter, and then spreading the manure in the vineyards in the spring. The biodynamic calendar identifies four categories of days: Root, Fruit, Flower, and Leaf days. Fruit days are the best for harvesting grapes. Root days are for pruning. Flower days are rest days for the vineyard. And Leaf days are for watering. Some even extend the biodynamic calendar to the finished product, by drinking these wines only on Flower or Fruit days. Those ardent followers believe this is the reason the same wine may taste differently on different days.  

Do organic or biodynamic wines taste better? I’ve never noticed a difference. But then again, I’ve never done a blind tasting, comparing organic, biodynamic, and conventional wines. Perhaps I’ll do just that, and share my findings in a future blog post!  

Whether organic and biodynamic wines are better quality or not, the practices employed in producing them are arguably better for the environment. In my opinion, anything I can do to be a better steward of the planet on which we live is worthwhile. After all, it’s the only environment we have.  

Have you tried organic or biodynamic wines? Let me know, in the comments, what you thought of them. 

Cheers!  

  • By Kent Reynolds