Tag Archives: Intertwine

Review: Intertwine Merlot Napa Valley 2015

As the Merlot revival continues, each vintage of Bridget Raymond’s annual contribution to the NakedWines.com portfolio grows in popularity. I reviewed the 2014 vintage of Intertwine, and it is one of my most-read blog posts. So it was with eager anticipation that I opened the newly released 2015 vintage.

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The Intertwine Merlot Napa Valley 2015 is made with fruit from the Oakville and Carneros AVAs. Both are among the finest, and best known regions in the Napa Valley. Whereas the 2014 showed its youth, and required ample aeration to be enjoyed young, the 2015 is smooth and delicious out of the bottle, although a bit of air allows it to open up, with more flavors emerging, and becoming even more enjoyable. As with most young wines, it will continue to improve with several months or years in the cellar.

This is the fourth vintage of Intertwine that I have had the pleasure of sampling. My tasting notes sum up my appreciation for this delightful juice:

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This could be the best vintage of Intertwine yet! The color is deep purple. On pouring through a Vinturi, this is a blackberry delight! Plenty of juicy fruit on the nose with a hint of oak. Through sheer willpower, I let it breathe for about 30 minutes before allowing the elixir to touch my lips. Patience, rewarded. As the wine opens up, the nose develops some tobacco, black cherry, and cedar notes. When finally tasted, wow! Bold blackberry, Marionberry pie, and black cherry fill the mouth. Full, round, rich mouthfeel coats the tongue. The tannins are firm, but will soften with bottle aging, and the acidity is fresh and lively. The finish is long, with cherry, berry, cedar, smoke, and spice. I even got a bit of dark chocolate at the very end.

Food worthy? Oh yes! Intertwine 2015 took my roasted pork loin with poached pears to an entirely new level! Stellar!

4.5+ out of 5 stars (92 – 95 points)

SRP: $27.99, Angel Price: $13.99

Intertwine Merlot Napa Valley 2015 is available exclusively from NakedWines.com. If this sounds like your kind of wine, you can follow this link to become an Angel, and receive a voucher worth $100 off your first-time order of $160 or more. If you try it, please let me know what you think!

Cheers!

My Winestory – #MWWC29

I can’t say exactly when I had my first taste of wine. As a child, Sunday dinner was a formal affair. We’d come home from church and change out of our “Sunday” clothes, only to dress again that evening for dinner. I clearly remember pot roast. Lots of pot roast. I also remember wine. My parents always served my sister and me a small glass of wine with Sunday dinner. I’m sure it was no more than an ounce or two. I assume that started around age 11 or 12. Mind you, this was wine from a jug, from one of the fine estates of E&J Gallo, Almaden, or Carlo Rossi, but wine it was.

Skip ahead a few years to junior high. In health class we studied a unit on alcohol, including a section on alcohol abuse and alcoholism. In one lesson, we took a quiz and to my shock, my parents’ drinking habits ticked almost all the boxes that indicate possible problems. Around this same time, I have vivid memories of my dad, passed out in his recliner after dinner. His normal habit after coming home from work was to toss back a couple of gin & tonics, then have a few glasses of wine with dinner. After dinner he’d retire to his recliner to watch TV, and within minutes, he was sawing logs. My sister and I laughed at it this first, but as I got older, it stopped being funny. One night, I tried to wake him up so he would go to bed, but I couldn’t, so I turned off the lights and went to my own bedroom to read.

I don’t know if my parents met the clinical definition of alcoholic, but with that kind of upbringing and exposure to excessive alcohol consumption, by high school, I had pretty much decided I was never going to let that happen to me. Whether alcohol abuse is an inherited genetic trait, or learned behavior (nature vs. nurture) I do not know. However, I do believe that children of alcoholics are much more likely to become alcoholics themselves. My sister is an example of this. She is a recovering alcoholic who, with the support of her AA friends and family, recently celebrated 18 years of sobriety!

So how, then, did I end up here? Not only drinking wine (and beer and liquor), but blogging about it? Glad you asked.

Monthly Wine Writing Challenge

John Taylor, author of Pairs With: Life, won #MWWC28, and his Major Award was to select the topic for #MWWC29. He chose: Winestory. An opportunity for us to share our personal stories about how we got here, and why in the world we decided to start writing a blog. Having sufficiently (I hope) set the stage, here is my

winestory

Like any other kid in living in a college dorm, despite my convictions, I occasionally succumbed to peer pressure. That’s when I first learned about the joys of the sweet elixir. I’m referring, of course, to White Zinfandel. In the early 80’s, this fine juice was in its heyday, and priced right for starving college students! It was everywhere! Kool-aid with a kick, and all the cool kids were drinking it. But I still wasn’t hooked.

In our early married years, my wife and I were pretty much teetotalers. st-innocentWe might have a glass of wine when we went out for a special occasion dinner, and would buy a bottle for home maybe twice a year. However, one fateful December when we were living in Oregon, we attended a company holiday party at St. Innocent Winery. At first I demurred when the hostess offered me a glass. Sure, I knew Pinot Noir is what put the Willamette Valley on the wine map, but I truly subscribed to the (untested and erroneous) belief that red wine gives me headaches. The hostess assured me that St. Innocent’s wine would not give me a headache. She was right, and the wine was delicious. The rest, as they say, is history.

I started buying wine regularly, and joined a wine club, receiving quarterly shipments of wines from all over the world. My journey of discovery and adventure had begun! Soon, friends and family were asking me for advice: wines to buy, pairing suggestions, anything wine related. I was hungry for knowledge about wine. I subscribed to magazines, and enrolled in web-based classes. Then one day, I received a voucher in the mail. My wine journey was about to change, and go in an entirely new direction.

If you have read my blog before, you probably know that I am a member, and ardent supporter of NakedWines.com. (If you are unfamiliar with NakedWines.com, please follow this link to their FAQ page.) When that voucher arrived, I was skeptical. I had been disappointed by many of the wine clubs I’d tried, but I figured $160 worth of wine for $60 was worth the one-time risk. Once the wine arrived and I had my first taste from the first bottle I opened, I was hooked.

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Not the actual First Bottle. It was so good, I bought more.

One of the things that sets NakedWines.com apart from traditional wine clubs is the social media aspect of the company. Members, known as Angels, are encouraged to post reviews of the wines they drink, and interact with each other…and the winemakers…on the website. I was surprised by how much I enjoyed writing the reviews of the wines. Even more surprising was the fact that other Angels were reading them, and commenting on how much they liked them. New Angels were starting to seek out my reviews and opinions. They were looking up to ME! I’m no sommelier, no winemaker, or any other sort of expert. I’m just a guy who drinks wine, with a new passion for writing about it.

The natural next step, then, was to figure out this whole blog thing, and start writing. So I did. My main focus is on sharing those wine reviews, expanding them beyond NakedWines.com, to include all the wines I enjoy. More than just reviews, though, I like to tell a story about the wine, the region, and if possible, the winemaker. My goal is to engage my audience, and if I may be so bold, perhaps educate them a little. Keeping my childhood in mind, and cognizant of my family history, and remain vigilant on my consumption. Nevertheless, wine has become my true passion, and sharing it brings me joy.

What’s in Your Cellar?

Cellar

Some day my wine cellar will look like this. We all have dreams, right?

I am a condo dweller. I have no basement. I do not have sufficient space for a large wine refrigerator or upright cellar. Instead, I have a 34 bottle chiller. (Why 34, Vinotemp? Why not an even 3-case 36?) With the bin at the bottom, I can squeeze in a few extra bottles, expanding my capacity to 38 when needed. I have some shipping packaging in an interior closet to stack my occasional overflow, but for the most part, I’m limited to about 3 cases of inventory at any given time. The truth is, since I’m not a collector, this is ample storage.

Condo Cellar

But I can still dream, can’t I? When our son left the nest a couple of years ago, we converted his room to a home office. While the room is occupied, I have my eye on his walk-in closet. Currently it is full of storage, but in my mind’s eye, I can see it lined with wood racks, sealed, and a compressor installed. Can’t you just imaging that mirror replaced with a glass viewing panel? Dreams can come true, can’t they?

Closet Door

While pondering what I’d do with a 200+ bottle cellar, I thought about what wines I currently have in storage. As I say, I’m not a collector. Silver Oak AV 07My oldest bottle is a 2007 Silver Oak Alexander Valley Cabernet Sauvignon. I’m holding it for another couple of years, with the intention of opening it in 2017, when it is 10 years old, for our 33rd anniversary. I know for some enthusiasts, 10 years is not a long time, but when you’ve limited space, it’s pretty darn long!

As a member of NakedWines.com, I have a lot of their wines. In fact, 18 of 33 wines in my current inventory are from NakedWines.com. BaroloOf these, some are “special” wines, including a 2010 Gianfranco & Serena Cordero Barolo DOCG, that I’m planning to hold for at least five more years.

I also have a three year vertical flight of Intertwine Napa Valley Merlot, by Bridget Raymond. (I recently reviewed the new 2014 vintage, here.) The 2012 was actually the first wine I opened in my NakedWines.com sample pack. It was so good, I immediately joined, and I haven’t looked back! In the spring of 2016, I’m planning to host a vertical tasting of the 2012, 2013, and 2014. (I’ll post the experience here afterward.)

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Other, non-NakedWines.com wines in my chiller include several Sauvignon Blancs, left-over from the dog days of summer and my 2015 Sauv Blanc obsession, and a Montepulciano D’Abruzzo, my new favorite Italian red. I also have a couple of Cabernet Sauvignons; St. Supery and Castillo di Amorosa, from our Napa mini-vacation this summer. For that obligatory bottle of bubbles, I have a Zonin Prosecco.

Frankly, I think I have a bunch of great wines on hand! Compared to a lot of my wine friends, it’s a small quantity, but it works for me. Some day, perhaps, I’ll be able to convert that closet, but until then, my 34 bottle chiller works just fine.

Which brings me to my original question: What’s in your cellar?

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I’m interested in what other wine lovers have in storage. Whether you have a six-bottle rack on your kitchen counter, or the cellar of my dreams, full of auction-worthy classics, please leave a comment and share some of your special bottles. I may not be able to taste them, but we can all enjoy each others wines vicariously.

Cheers!

Review: Intertwine Napa Valley Merlot 2014

Another NakedWines.com exclusive, Intertwine is made by winemaker Bridget Raymond. Growing up in the Napa Valley, Bridget knows all the best vineyards, and produces some spectacular wines. The Merlot grapes for the Intertwine Napa Valley Merlot are from the renowned Oakville AVA. A bit of Rutherford Cab and Petit Verdot are added to make it even better.

imageI’ve been looking forward to the 2014 Intertwine for many months. My patience has been rewarded. This wine is big, and young. Bridget herself advises waiting several months before tasting to let it mature. Well, I am both impatient, and also one of her NakedWines.com Archangels*, so I felt it was my duty to dive in and give it a try.

I decanted for about two hours. Of course, I had a sip before decanting, because, science. Besides, beneath the foil, I found these instructions: image

imageThis is a delicious wine! The color is ruby in the glass. Aromas of cherry, raspberry, and soft oak greet the nose. These flavors are present on the tongue as well, along with some dark berry, black currant, and spice. The finish is long, with berry and mocha. The wine has a rich, full body. At this point, the tannins are tight but not overbearing. It is quite enjoyable now. I’ll check in again in a couple hours.

imageI’m back! Oh, my! What a difference some air makes. The tannins are now soft and smooth. The chocolate/mocha flavors are more pronounced, and this wine is full, round, and stunning! Imagine how this will taste in six months. Bridget, you’ve done it again! 4.5 out of 5 Hearts.

You’d expect to pay $40 or more for an Oakville Merlot of this quality. However, this wine is available exclusively to NakedWines.com customers for just $13.99! Click here to learn more, and to get a voucher worth $100 off a first-time order of $160 or more.

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* NakedWines.com members are known as Angels, because they provide the funding that allows winemakers to make their wines. The most active Angels are given the title of Archangel, and help support winemakers they follow.